SEAS Computing has migrated all HPC hardware to FAS Research Computing (FASRC). New users should obtain a FAS RC account by visiting https://rc.fas.harvard.edu.

 Windows

Step 1:  Apply for a SEAS account

You need a SEAS account to access our resources. 

Forgot your SEAS password? Reset it at https://password.seas.harvard.edu

Step 2: Get FAS VPN (Virtual Private Network) and start your client

Using either your Harvard ID and PIN or your FAS username and password, you can access the following site, download and install a small client on your machine.

 Why do I need a VPN? You need to be connected to a VPN to transfer your public key to our login.seas. server. The only way to access the SEAS login server using password authentication is by connecting through the FAS VPN first; this provides a sort of two-factor authentication, since you need to first perform a PIN authentication before using your password to login. 

Step 3: Download PuTTYGen and generate your pair of public and private keys 

PuTTYgen is used to create a private/public key pair on the Windows system.  

 

A proper public OpenSSH key begins with "ssh-rsa" separated by a space from the rest of the key and concludes with a comment following the rest of the key, separated by a space.  If the public key generated by puTTYgen places a comment first (such as "rsa-key-20101005"), edit the file using a text editor to obtain the correct form.

Step 4: Download PuTTY, run it and configure your system

PuTTY is a freely available ssh client that supports public key authentication, and also provides its own ssh-agent called "Pageant" agent.


Step 5: Connect to Compute Resources using PuTTy

[mary@login ~]$ mkdir .ssh
        (this folder probably exists in your account)
 
[mary@login ~]$ touch .ssh/authorized_keys
        (Using you favorite command line editor paste your public key, that you have saved previously, into this file)
 

 

[mary@login ~]$ chmod 0600 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys
[mary@login ~]$ chmod 0700 ~/.ssh

Congratulations, you are done!

You are now ready to login into our machines! 

 


Additional Recourses :

 For a great overview of what we just did, visit : http://www.unixwiz.net/techtips/putty-openssh.html

Your server should now be configured to accept authentication using your private key. Now you need to configure PuTTY to attempt authentication using your private key. You can do this in any of three ways:

In addition, the secure file transfer program WinSCP uses Pageant to manage ssh keys as well.

Other resources for PuTTY include:

The puTTYgen command can be used to create a private/public key pair on the Windows system.  The private key can be installed into puTTY and the public key can be installed on the remote host following the procedure outlined above.  Note that a proper public OpenSSH key begins with "ssh-rsa" separated by a space from the rest of the key and concludes with a comment following the rest of the key, separated by a space.  If the public key generated by puTTYgen places a comment first (such as "rsa-key-20101005"), edit the file using a text editor to obtain the correct form.  Please also see this.

For a more technical general discussion on SSH technology, please see here.

For a discussion how to automate and store the SSH key handling for e.g. server to server connecticity, please see the instructions on SSH agent forwarding .

The following are links to documentation, tutorials and HowTos on SSH